Transportation Law News

July 21, 2010

Calls to Update Maritime Laws

According to a recent piece in the New York Times, Lawmakers in Washington are is fixed on the legal and financial fallout of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico on BP and firms like Transocean, the operator of the Deepwater Horizon rig that sank in April.

Clink: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/06/business/06seas.html

Transportation Law News

July 20, 2010

Upcoming Requirement for Rail Safety May Bleed Capital Badly Needed for Rail Expansion

Of great concern to US railroads but little known by shippers are upcoming requirements for vast new electronic systems, known by the term “positive train control” (PTC), thought by regulators to produce substantial improvements in rail safety. The Association of American Railroads (AAR), the industry’s trade and lobbying group, is questioning whether the billions in investment required to implement PTC is worth the cost.

Clink: http://www.scdigest.com/ASSETS/ON_TARGET/10-07-20-2.PHP?CID=3592

We wanted to point out this resource from the American Disabilities Association

The Disability Law Handbook Transportation

From the Handbook:

“Paratransit is a transportation service that supplements public transit fixed route systems by providing door-to-door service for individuals with disabilities who cannot use the fixed route service.”

From more Clink: http://www.ilru.org/dlrp/html/publications/dlh/transportation.html

Transportation Law News

July 13, 2010

Transportation for America proposal creates more jobs than current transportation law, Economic Policy Institute finds.

T4 America’s proposed $500 billion transportation bill would support more than 7.2 million jobs, 400,000 more jobs than would be created by continuing SAFETEA-LU, the current transportation law, at the same $500 billion level.

From more click here.

Freak Calgary fatality renews concern over vehicle safety standards

“A fatal accident earlier this week in Calgary has renewed concerns about highway safety in Alberta, where a third of commercial vehicles routinely fail safety inspections.”

Clink here for more.

US Federal prosecutors have unsealed a criminal complaint charging Colton Harris-Moore — the teenage “Barefoot Bandit” being sought by authorities from Washington state’s San Juan Islands to the Bahamas — with interstate transportation of stolen property in connection with the theft of an Idaho airplane that crashed and was abandoned near Granite Falls, Wash., in October.

The complaint, filed in December in U.S. District Court and unsealed Tuesday, accuses Harris-Moore, 19, of stealing a $340,000 turbo Cessna 182 on Sept. 29 from a private airport where investigators found bare footprints. Similar footprints have been found at other crime scenes linked to Harris-Moore, according to the complaint.

Read here for more:

Fed Suing to Block Arizona Immigration Law

What’s the Obama administration’s argument against the Arizona immigration law?

While most of the criticism of the law has been that it could encourage racial profiling, the administration’s challenge is based on the so-called supremacy clause of the U.S. Constitution — that when state and federal laws conflict, federal law is supreme. In this case, the administration is saying that anything that relates to foreign policy or relations with other countries is strictly the province of the federal government and
that Arizona’s law interferes with a federal function.

“In our constitutional system, the power to regulate immigration is exclusively vested in the federal government,” the Justice Department brief said. “The immigration framework set forth by Congress and administered by federal agencies reflects a careful and considered balance of national law enforcement, foreign relations, and humanitarian concerns — concerns that belong to the nation as a whole, not a single state.”

Clink here for more.